About Me

I'm Justin Beirold. I'm a deeply curious person, and I never shy away from a challenge. I have years of experience in marketing and business development, which is the shiny, carefully polished tip of the industrial icebergs that I try to understand in detail through Political Economy research.

I study Political Economy at UC Berkeley because it's both broad and rigorous, qualitative and quantitative. The major explores the intersection of political science and economics, and my own academic research focuses on the role of technology in development economics (historically and today).

I enjoy marketing because I love exchanging stories and using data to make sure I’m exchanging them with the right people. I've worked at a global strategic communications firm in Washington DC, and done marketing and digital media consulting for businesses, startups, and non profits.

As a student, these days I put most of my attention into producing high quality work on my own. But I believe that we can accomplish far more with others than in isolation, and I thrive when I’m working on a team. There is nothing more intellectually satisfying to me than when a smart colleague or friend questions my work and changes my perspective, or when I manage to tease an amazing idea out of a quiet genius who was too afraid to speak up. I’ve been told that one of my best qualities is my ability to inspire and empower others. That’s why marketing is so much more than just slick photography and catchy copy; if you can tell a story which brings out the best in other people, it’s possible to connect with even the most reluctant or disinterested audience.

I'd love to get to know you!

-Justin Beirold
justinbeirold@gmail.com

“I cannot believe it! The Internet was supposed to be a lawless frontier where all of humanity’s vices and desires merged into a roiling collective id held in check by a barely regulated rat’s nest of technical abstractions I don’t understand. How did that get out of control?”-

-Stephen Colbert on the Heartbleed SSL bug